THE COLLOQUIUM
October 26-29, 2018
INTENTION

In Canada, there are seven recognized schools of landscape architecture. Today the core team will address diversity in research, collaborative approaches and potentials in our individual faculties, and how to mobilize landscape-based interdisciplinary research. From the regional or institution level, the discussion will expand to the national level to identify, address and provide further insights into 

Knowledge of the way landscapes shape our lives, and the ways knowledge + values influence how we form the landscape, are revealed through conversation.

current Canadian landscape research. We want the graduate students to actively participate in this discussion. We hope to engage students in contemporary methods and questions, preparing them for the following day with the extended group and expert presentations. Conversations will address the reciprocal relationship of knowledge values, and landscapes to ground the importance of our research shaping the future. Knowledge of the way landscapes shape our lives, and the ways knowledge and values influence how we form the landscape, are revealed through conversation.

 
THREE INITIAL AREAS OF RESEARCH FOCUS
INDIGENOUS MATTERS
HERITAGE AND IDENTITY
CLIMATE CHANGE
+
KNOWLEDGE MOBILIZATION
 
INDIGENOUS MATTERS
Sheri Longboat, University of Guelph
Jim Thomas, HTFC, Winnipeg

“Our landscape is in a constant state of change. From the physical forces acting upon it to the cultural values imposed on it, the natural and the built landscape is malleable. One continuum, often overlooked in colonial landscape histories, is Indigenous knowledge. This session will address past disparities by inviting elders and policy-makers into a discussion about Indigenous knowledge and landscape architecture.

The professional guidelines outlined in the Canadian Landscape Charter and recommendations proposed by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) form the foundation of this research focus to highlight the diversity of our regional landscapes while developing shared values, and professional approaches, to a shared landscape vision (TRC). The Charter’s vision is inclusive and strongly aligns with many of the values among Canada’s Indigenous cultures.

While landscapes vary physiographically across the country, like cultural nuances, they are fundamentally driven by a local understanding and knowledge of place. Indigenous knowledge is an invaluable primary source in landscape research. The pathway to reconciling incongruences, “is about establishing and maintaining a mutually respectful relationship between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal peoples in this country” (TRC 2015, 113).

Research in landscape architecture is typically built around contested lands, along with economic, cultural, spiritual, and recreational uses. In this session, research transects the reconciliation process by asking questions. Rather than looking for answers, the aim is to open pathways for research and foster collaborative initiatives within the discipline and find potential avenues to build upon existing research in art, literature, history, and law, inter alia.” 

(from SSHRC Application)

While landscapes vary physiographically across the country, like cultural nuances, they are fundamentally driven by a local understanding and knowledge of place. Indigenous knowledge is an invaluable primary source in landscape research.
University of Guelph
SHERI LONGBOAT
JIM THOMAS
HTFC Planning + Design, Winnipeg
 
HERITAGE + IDENTITY IN URBAN, RURAL, AND INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPES
Enrica Dall’Ara, University of Calgary
Marie-Claude Quessy, Government of Canada, Gatineau

"In 1992, the World Heritage Convention brought concepts of nature conservation and cultural landscape preservation to the forefront of global consciousness (UNESCO 2015, Operational Guidelines, http://whc.unesco.org/en/guidelines). The programs that resulted raise public awareness of exceptional sites, and work with international partners to conserve globally significant cultural landscapes. However, the concept of preserving remarkable cultural landscapes, in a certain sense, loses sight of the scale of proximity, including human and urban landscape scales. Consequently, part of our cultural landscapes are set aside – that of the designed landscape – due to weak policy and sparse expertise and research. Canadian urban, peri-urban, rural, and industrial sites 

[...] the concept of preserving remarkable cultural landscapes, in a certain sense, loses sight of the scale of proximity, including human and urban landscape scales. 

are viewed as cultural landscapes. Scholars who engage in questions of contemporary definitions of heritage and those who probe landscape and identity will lead a discussion on current and future areas of research. The aim is to improve existing and future research by sharing critical questions that will address the scale of cultural landscapes as heritage and identity." From SSHRC Application

University of Calgary
ERNICA DALL'ARA
MARIE-CLAUDE QUESSY
Government of Canada, Gatineau
 
CLIMATE CHANGE AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Kees Lokman, University of British Columbia
Hope Parnham, University of Prince Edward Island

"The impacts of climate change on the land and our built environments are undeniable and increasing. Research in landscape architecture resides at the interface of these two worlds – the natural and the built – to develop knowledge and shape resiliency strategies. Scholars investigate climate change by modelling coastal areas, creating approaches to flood mitigation and drought, partnering with community groups in forming programs to reduce carbon emissions, and examining how residents in northern regions address the impacts of rising temperatures, in particular. Landscape architecture research contributes to our knowledge of the effects of climate change by collaborating with scientists and the public in understanding the interdependence of environmental 

Landscape architecture research contributes to our knowledge of the effects of climate change by collaborating with scientists and the public in understanding the interdependence of environmental processes.

processes. This focus area examines cross-disciplinary research strategies and how landscape architects can lead climate change research that considers both environmental and human health. The discussion will also address how to bridge the gap between research and professional practice with land-based solutions. The focus is on communication tools and how to widely disseminate this critical area of research." From SSHRC Application

University of British Columbia
KEES LOKMAN
University of Prince Edward Island
HOPE PARNHAM
 
KNOWLEDGE MOBILIZATION
Alyssa Schwann, University of Manitoba
Alan Tate, University of Manitoba
Doug Olson, O2, Calgary

“Landscape architecture is a practice-directed, research-dependent discipline. From academic journals to professional magazines, and traditional book publications to digital formats, contemporary research knowledge instructs future research as much as it informs practitioners who implement change through design. Research and practice influence one another, and the multidirectional flow of knowledge in landscape architecture is essential for making informed design decisions. This session will address how to co-

Research and practice influence one another, and the multidirectional flow of knowledge in landscape architecture is essential for making informed design decisions.

author in interdisciplinary research, how to choose an audience to make the most impact, and what to expect when signing a book contract. The aim is to give emerging scholars the tools to publish efficiently and increase the exchange of research knowledge. In addition to established forms of publication, session chairs will open a discussion on digital futures and on how best to disseminate findings from this event among participants and different audiences.” (from SSHRC Application) 

University of Manitoba
ALYSSA SCHWANN
University of Manitoba
ALAN TATE
DOUG OLSON
O2 Planning + Design, Calgary
 
ALL VIDEOS
HTFC Planning + Design, Winnipeg
JIM THOMAS
University of Guelph
SHERI LONGBOAT
DISCUSSION SESSION #1
Indigenous Matters
NICOLE VALOIS
Université de Montréal
University of Calgary
ERNICA DALL'ARA
Government of Canada
MARIE-CLAUDE QUESSY
DISCUSSION SESSION #2
Landscape Heritage + Identity
KEES LOKMAN
University of British Columbia
University of Prince Edward Island
HOPE PARNHAM
Climate Change and Landscape Architecture
DISCUSSION SESSION #3
University of Manitoba
ALYSSA SCHWANN
University of Manitoba
ALAN TATE
O2 Planning + Design
DOUG OLSON
Knowledge Mobilization
DISCUSSION #4